“I know thee well; a serviceable villain.”

King Lear, Act 4, Scene 6

William Shakespeare

As usual my pre-university post-summer September spike is here, and I’m back reviewing. First up, the National Theatre’s production of The Threepenny OperablogIn a new adaptation of Brecht and Weill’s famous collaboration by Simon Stephens, Rory Kinnear stars as king of the murky underworld of the East End, Captain Macheath aka Mack the Knife – that’s right, the one from the song. I had no idea, in fact, that the ‘Mack the Knife’ song of Michael Buble and Robbie Williams was originally from this show. It’s actually in a way a relief for a Brecht/Weill virgin like me to be introduced to their dark and spiky theatrical and musical style through a jazz standard. In fact, I’ve attached Buble to give added atmosphere while reading this review – enjoy!

Kinnear was my main reason for going to see this production; he’s never let me down before and he did not disappoint this time either. His Mack was a completely immoral, shameless, self-centred arsehole, who nonetheless – or perhaps unsurprisingly – was very entertaining to watch. blog-5His singing voice was unexpectedly good as well, and his trademark distinct diction came in very handy in this musical where the words seemed really more important than the music. Rosalie Craig as Polly Peachum, Nick Holder as J.J. Peachum, and Sharon Small as Jenny Diver were all equally clear in their phrasing which was much needed. However, although Haydn Gwynne brought much to the part of Celia Peachum, it was very hard to understand a lot of the words when she sang. It sounded to me (not to get too technical) like the break between her chest and head voice was weirdly low in her range. This meant most of her solos couldn’t be belted; instead they became a little shrill and less clear.

George Ikediashi had the most beautiful voice of the cast as the Balladeer. blog-4I only wished he’d had more solos than just the ones at the beginning and the end. I can’t lie, the music wasn’t necessarily what I’d listen to on a daily basis, and it did feel occasionally like some of the songs were unnecessary, particularly in the first half. Saying this, the band was absolutely fantastic. It’s always lovely having the music-makers visible on stage, and this production particularly used this to great effect. In fact, the staging in general was one of the best things about Rufus Norris’s production. Vicki Mortimer has worked out a fascinatingly bare-yet-cluttered set design which makes full use of the Olivier’s famous revolving drum. blog-3The effect is to provide something obviously theatrical, where the atmosphere, rather than the image, of London’s East End is produced. It is made very clear when the actors and crew are moving sets, and these sets are made out of quite ordinary materials (paper and wood), yet altogether, lifted out of the depths of the stage, they make something extraordinary.

This is a play that gets better as it goes on, with the overtly melodramatic ending as the clear highlight of the show. Peter de Jersey and Matt Cross as the consistently corrupt Police Inspector and Police Officer also stood out comedically. blog-2I loved that the amorality of the play was made clear from the start. Nonetheless, despite Kinnear’s excellent performance, and the staging, this self-proclaimed amorality and the focus on satire rather than emotion somewhat distances the audience. You can be entertained by the foul and lewd behaviour, yes, but you can’t emotionally connect with it. That’s not really the point of this I suppose, and yet it did leave me feeling a little unsatisfied; I guess I’m somewhat of a sentimentalist, but there you go. The Threepenny Opera will be screened as part of NT Live sometime this month, I believe; it is worth going to see, if only for the set, but it’s not a play that left me with any sense of lasting impact.

The Threepenny Opera at the National Theatre: 3/5 stars

“O, she is rich in beauty”

Romeo and Juliet, Act 1, Scene 1

William Shakespeare

I feel like I’ve missed a lot of great things at the St James Theatre recently, and indeed lots of great theatre starring Catherine Tate, so buying tickets for Miss Atomic Bomb was an obvious one. blog 5It’s also refreshing to hear of a new musical that isn’t based on an existing film, book, or music; which has a completely original plot. And original this certainly is! It’s just a shame that the five years which have apparently gone into developing the production aren’t particularly evident from the overall scrappiness of the narrative, as hard as the performers work to cover this up.

To quickly summarise the plot for you – or at least attempt to (!) – the whole thing takes place around Las Vegas, where in the deserts of Nevada, farm-girl Candy Johnston (Florence Andrews) and her fashion designer friend Myra (Catherine Tate) watch the atom-bombs go off like they’re a “second sunset”.

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Through a series of extremely random coincidences involving an escaped soldier, a pair of ruthless gangsters, an officious bank employee, and a lot of dead sheep, Candy ends up deciding to enter the brand new Las Vegas ‘Miss Atomic Bomb’ beauty pageant. As I said, it’s complicated.

The thing is, there are quite a few funny moments in here; it’s not like it isn’t an enjoyable evening out. ‘All My Sheep Are Gone’ is utterly ridiculous, the drag queen entrant Carol (Charles Brunton) to the beauty pageant is fab, and I really appreciated the hyperbolic Les Mis-Javert tribute by Daniel Boys at the end – but it was just all so haphazardly put together that it was hard to focus a lot of the time.

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It felt like each idea with potential had been developed by a different person or team and then they’d had a quick meeting and kind of smushed it all together.

This means there are several amusing jokes either buried under tons of dancing Las Vegas girls, crazy scientists or army generals, or drawn out for rather too long – like Simon Lipkin and Tate’s duet about sugar daddies and beards (I can’t find the titles of the songs anywhere, and I was too cheap to buy a programme, sorry!).

 

To be more succinct, the jokes are either dwelt on too much, or not dwelt on enough. The timing of the script seems off, a fault saved only by the excellent comic timing of some of the cast, particularly Lipkin and Tate.

The singing was also of an extremely high quality.blog 4 In the lead male role of Joey, Dean John-Wilson produced some absolutely beautiful moments, particularly those in his higher range. I found myself thinking about downloading the soundtrack simply because of the vocals to be honest. It was just a shame we didn’t really get a proper exploration of his character; and that, in the twenty-first century, we’re still lumped with the whole ‘boy-meets-girl, they fall in love almost at first sight (or at least within the space of a song), and change everything bad about themselves in order to get together’ trope. To be fair, Joey and Candy’s relationship could perhaps be taken as a pastiche of this, but only at a pinch.

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Thank god Tate and Lipkin’s characters had a more interesting relationship. Still, Andrews’ voice, too, was lovely and very expressive. Tate had a fine pair of lungs on her, although – as I think many have noted – her accent sways from Southern to Australian and back with astonishing rapidity.

This is a show, then, where the overall scrappiness of plot, and the general blandness of the music lets a strong cast down. Tate and Lipkin’s comic talent deserves better than jokes about having a long name, or being shot in the foot. I should also mention David Birrell’s excellently camp number in the role of General Westcott. There were just so many random moments in this musical that the real issues of nuclear bombs, when to run away and when to stick around, and indeed the central love story between Candy and Joey weren’t focused on nearly enough. That being said, it’s still an enjoyable evening out; the cast is of a high enough quality to smooth over the cracks, and there are quite a few pretty funny moments. Miss Atomic Bomb isn’t one you should be hurrying to buy tickets for, but if you’ve already booked definitely go, you’ll have a fun night out.

Miss Atomic Bomb at the St James Theatre: 2/5 stars

“Music oft hath such a charm / To make bad good and good provoke to harm”

Measure for Measure, Act 4, Scene 1

William Shakespeare

That theatre is often supposed to make you uncomfortable is a received view. blog 6Yet it feels to me like playwrights and directors increasingly use extreme violence, swearing and sex as almost shortcuts to achieving this effect on their audience. Perhaps this is partly a result of my seeing student theatrics increasingly coming with ‘trigger warnings’ (I saw a brilliantly-acted, but gruesomely graphic production of Philip Ridley’s Mercury Fur a few weeks ago), but one need only think of the furore surrounding the National Theatre’s Cleansed (Sarah Kane) or Jamie Lloyd’s visceral productions of Macbeth or Richard III to see this trend of explicit gore.

Dominic Cooke’s revival of August Wilson’s play Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom at the National Theatre does indeed include violence, sex, and swearing; but what makes the production so brilliant, and actually so important to see, is that this isn’t what made me squirm in my seat. Rather, it is the powerful rendering of black African-American life in the 1920s that makes a white, middle-class, privileged viewer like myself uneasy.

blogThose more experienced theatre viewers than myself will have to bear with here; I’d never seen an August Wilson play before, or, to my shame, even heard of the playwright before this. In fact, I am embarrassingly ill-educated about BME playwrights in general, something I’ll definitely be making an effort to rectify.

For those of you, like me, who also know little about the play, here’s a quick summary: in a Chicago recording studio in 1927, four band members rehearse and talk (and argue!) whilst waiting for the ‘Mother of Blues’, Ma Rainey to arrive. The play takes place just before, and during this recording session, as we are introduced not only to Ma herself, or rather Madam, as the diva likes to be known, but also these four musicians; Cutler, the leader; Toledo, the intellectual of the group; Slow Drag, the quieter, superstitious bass player; and Levee, the loud, wildly unstable trumpet player, desperate to become a big jazz star in his own right.

It was O.T. Fagbenle in this latter role who was really the star of the production, blog 4every moment a performance, whether he was checking himself out in the locker mirrors, or stammering and stuttering over his lines, or dancing around the rather cramped area of the stage to which the musicians were confined for a large amount of the action.

I thought this staging worked pretty well; with the recording studio taking over the whole of the Lyttelton stage, the white characters of the managers and recording executives symbolically placed ‘above’ in the sound booth, and the band’s thin slice of a rehearsal room, where most of the action takes place, rising out of the floor at the front of the stage. Its thinness provided an important sense of claustrophobia, as the drama heightened throughout the course of the show.

blog 2A lot of this drama, and particularly the ‘back-story sections’ which – to sound old-fartish – I have grown to loathe in modern drama, only works so well because of the superb acting from the cast. With ‘back-story sections’ I mean those moments when a character suddenly launches into a long epistle about their past, explaining their entire character and motives for action in one dramatic monologue; it feels to me like these are just psychiatrist couch outpourings which are an easy way for a playwright to get out of having to tell a character’s mind through subtler mannerisms and oddly placed words. There were quite a few of these long speeches in Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, and yet the actors, particularly Fagbenle and the excellent Lucian Msmati as Toledo, managed to make them seem spontaneous enough that they didn’t jar too much in the course of the action. Giles Terera (Slow Drag) and Clint Dyer (Cutler), meanwhile, managed to create a strong sense of the bond between their two characters, without so much of the storytelling. I was especially impressed by the musicianship of all four actors; although there is actually less music than you would think from a play set in a recording studio.blog 5

Luckily, we do get to hear some of Sharon D Clarke’s smooth vocals as Ma Rainey. Clarke inhabits this central role totally, portraying both the extreme diva and her reasons for being so demanding. Finbar Lynch as Irvin, Ma’s manager who maintains constantly that he can “sort it”, was excellently efficacious, and I also liked Tunji Lucas as the shy, stuttering Sylvester, Ma Rainey’s nephew.

In fact, the only real problem I had with the performance I went to see was the audience. Perhaps it was a result of being at a weekday matinee, but it felt as though the largely white, elderly audience was self-congratulatory. The setting of the play in both the past, and another country, seemed to allow them to distance themselves from any blame, with even some outright laughter being heard during the final, most distressing climax. There was blog 3also laughter during Slyvester’s stuttering: “Oh, don’t make him do it” was heard through titters. I’m aware that this may sound typically-critic-like, as if no one quite understands the play as well as I do. Yet the outright laughter just really irritated me, when such important issues – which are still relevant – were being raised.

The National Theatre have combined with playwright Kwame Kwei-Amah to create the Black Plays Archive, a website providing information and digital resources addressing the contribution of African, Caribbean and black British playwrights to British theatre. Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom is an excellent revival, worth seeing for the acting alone, but made more important because of its message. My hope is that its success will not only impact the thoughts of those seeing it, but also encourage Rufus Norris and his team to put on more BME works in the future – particularly contemporary British ones, so that it is not quite so easy for an audience to distance themselves from guilt by means of accent or dress.

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom at the National Theatre: 4.5/5 stars

“I defy you, stars!”

Romeo and Juliet, Act 5, Scene 1

William Shakespeare

What makes a five star show?blog 1

To be honest, this is kind of an unanswerable question, but the (very minor) Twitter controversy over my latest “confused” review of Kinky Boots has made me realise perhaps I need to make it a little clearer how I decide my production star ratings.

Many people, including the lovely and incredibly talented West End Wilma felt I was a little harsh giving Kinky Boots only three stars, despite a pretty positive review overall. Now, I concede I definitely wrote that review in rather a hurry, and so it probably does feel a bit confused. However, I stand by the rating.

What’s surprising that usually I’m criticised over being overly generous! And it’s true, I very rarely give a two or one star review – partly because I genuinely do find something to enjoy or something that interests me in almost everything I see (hooray for great theatre!); and partly perhaps because I see more West End and less Fringe theatre (not that Fringe theatre is in anyway worse – in fact it’s often better and more original to boot – but there’s less budget available and with less publicity, perhaps less constant checking for success – though if I’m wrong on this, do correct me!).

My reviews mostly vary between 3 and 4 star ratings, and sometimes I even cheekily sneak half stars in for when I really want to differentiate between very similar but slightly different shows. tumblr_msbcpvIVtG1stovino1_500

A five star show, however, is far more rare. A five star show has to have something other than a great cast, fab set and magnificent directing. For me, it has to be a production that leaves me slightly amazed; one that I just want to talk about to everyone I meet; one that either really makes me laugh or really makes me think. It’s a kind of undefinable quality that perhaps has more to do with me than than entirely the show itself.

Despite this, my aim is always to give five stars to the things I can’t recommend highly enough, the things I truly think you would enjoy and the shows I’m just desperate for you to see so that we can have intense fandom discussions about it!

Urinetown, The Trial, King Charles III have all left me flabbergasted and therefore, in my view, earned their five stars. Brilliant productions like Kenneth Branagh’s The Winter’s Tale and the RSC’s Death of Salesman got four stars because they were technically superb but I didn’t get the feeling, where I want to grab people on the tube and force them to come see it with me because I just know their lives will be better if they do. Kinky Boots got three stars because it was enjoyable, but I felt Charlie was a bit of a weak protagonist; there were elements, such as Lola’s struggle to be accepted in Northampton, that could have been capitalised on further; and I have no real desire to see it over and over again.

Perhaps you disagree. Perhaps you think it’s infuriating not to reward technically excellent productions, or perhaps you just did get “the feeling” from Kinky Boots or something else I’ve three-starred. As to the latter, that is absolutely your right, and it’s one of the things I love most about theatre; that everyone has their own favourite that suddenly thrills and inspired them, and that you can’t predict an audience’s reaction to anything. To those arguing the former, again, that is your perogative. But to feel something is, I think, the point of theatre, and a production technically superb that leaves me cold is not one I would want to recommend unhesitatingly to anyone else.

“For the apparel oft proclaims the man.”

Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 3

William Shakespeareblog 7

“The sex is in the heel” croons Matt Henry’s Lola in the new West End musical Kinky Boots,
one of our latest imports from Broadway, although based on a British film, set in England, and indeed inspired originally by a real fetish footwear factory in Northampton. These trans-Atlantic crossovers make for some brilliantly British characters, some Broadway-style dance numbers, but also some slightly weird accents along the way.

Henry is clearly the standout star of the show. His Lola (and Simon – if you hadn’t realised, Lola is a rather fabulous drag queen, worthy of RuPaul’s show) blog 1is a revelation by turns frightening, confident, movingly vulnerable, and often incredibly witty. Killian Donnolly, meanwhile, does well as the difficult straight-man part Charlie, although I found the incredibly twanged American accent whilst he was singing a little put on – saying this, my brother did point out the lyrics must have been originally written for American actors, so perhaps Donnolly was simply forced into it by the rhythm and rhyme.

His love interest Lauren (and I refuse to apologise for spoilers here; this is musical theatre after all, darlings, and we all know in musical-land, it’s virtually impossible for two people who start off together to end up together – unless of course they’re married) was played with great energy and gusto by Sophie Isaacs blog 6– who is actually the understudy, though you absolutely couldn’t tell from her performance. She is the typically awkward Brit; her solo number of The History of Wrong Guys was one of my highlights of the show, with some fab choreography delivered with a great sense of comedy and a touching message underneath it all.

Don, the factory worker who reacts the most aggressively to the arrival of Lola and her gang of six impeccably dressed ‘Angels’, was also played by an understudy on the night I visited, with Tim Prottey-Jones taking on the role with aplomb. The Angels themselves were perhaps the most impressive performers of the night, dancing their way through the big songs – which included running on conveyer belts – all in insanely high heels and extravagant costumes, massive smiles, and not a fault inKINKY BOOTS sight. The two kids playing Young Charlie and Young Lola/Simon were adorable. George (Michael Hobbs), the wise chief factory worker with a bit of a soft spot for Lola’s way of life it seems, was great fun to watch, especially within the group numbers.

The songs themselves – perhaps the most important part of a musical – are seriously good fun. Cyndi Lauper has written some great tunes, two of which I’ve already mentioned, and I found I’m Not My Father’s Son, although very cliché musical theatre, to be surprisingly emotional. The ridiculous Everybody Say Yeah just before the interval, whilst saying incredibly little, is classic musical exuberance. These aren’t necessarily tunes I’ll be playing and replaying on my iPod, but a couple of them definitely stuck in my head after the show, and I enjoyed them all while they were going on.blog 3

Yet this production didn’t quite live up to my expectations – the movie (starring Chiwetel Ejiofor) is really fab, and actually the musical has gotten lots of five star reviews, and a few Tony Awards to boot. However, although I enjoyed myself, this wasn’t an evening I came out of amazed, or blown away, or particularly thoughtful. It was a good, fun evening, with some solid tunes and a fantastic performance from Henry. It’s not, however, one I’m desperate to go back and re-watch – and that’s probably my biggest test of the success of a musical. With Kinky Boots, I’m glad I saw it, but it’s not one I’ll be saving up my money to buy another ticket for as soon as possible.

Kinky Boots at the Adelphi Theatre: 3/5 stars

“So quick bright things come to confusion.”

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 1, Scene 1

William Shakespeare

If what you’re looking for in the theatre is colours, dance, crazy blog 6scenery and exaggerated characters, then wonder.land, the National Theatre’s new, modern, musical version of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, is the show for you.

Having read many recent reviews rubbishing this adaptation of the famous book, both in newspapers and in many of the reviews by my fellow #LDNTheatreBloggers. I entered the Olivier Theatre therefore with reasonably low expectations; of a mediocre score, a chaotic set, and a confusing storyline. And these three things were all true. Damon Albarn’s songs are pretty forgettable, the set is insanely cluttered, and the storyline, already confusing in the original book, is even more so with the added layer of modern conceit

wonder.land
Musical
Royal National Theatre, London

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However, surprisingly, none of this really mattered! I really enjoyed this musical; it’s not one for the ages, no, I can’t see it transferring or anything, but the experience was never boring – and what’s more, at least it was an experience, and one which is actually surprisingly hard to forget. wonder.land pictures the mythical land of Wonderland as a virtual reality website; as the Cheshire Cat (an exuberant Hal Fowler) loudly proclaims as he whizzes about the stage on his seemingly magical armchair, “www dot wonder dot land….”

Aly is our hero, played with spirit by Lois Chimimba, a shy girl who escapes from her mum and dad’s traumatic separation, three school bullies (amusingly named after the original Alice’s cats Dinah, Mary Ann and Kitty), and her baby brother who won’t stop throwing up, by creating an avatar, ‘Alice’, for herself. It is pointed out by the actors (just in case we didn’t get it ourselves) that this avatar is white, in contrast to Aly’s mixed race heritage.

wonder.land
Musical
Royal National Theatre, London

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“I hate me” proclaims Aly with a typically teenage melodrama mixed with truth. “Who are you?” is the repeated question she is asked; problems of self-identity which most can relate to. In fact, the entire musical has a very One-Direction-esque message “You don’t know you’re beautiful” aka ‘be yourself’; be comfortable in your own skin. In this sense, then, it really isn’t particularly ground-breaking at all.

What is fascinating, and the most fun to watch, is the way this world of wonder.land is created on stage, in contrast to the grey and dull world in which Aly, her mother, father, brother and schoolmates live. It’s easy to see why headmistress Mrs Manxome (in the star turn of the night, a hilariously hyperbolic performance from Anna Francolini), after confiscating Aly’s phone, is immediately drawn into this world of colour and creatures and craziness.

wonder.land
Musical
Royal National Theatre, London

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There’s the digital purple, widely grinning Cheshire Cat face and the gas-masked, white tutu-ed White Rabbit (Joshua Lacey). There’s the glittering blue Caterpillar (played by Fowler with another golden-toothed grin) and his body, each orb played by a different dancer with some incredible choreography by Javier De Frutos. There are the other avatars; a transvestite dodo, bulimic ballet dancers Dee and Dum, and a giant mouse, who in real life is “a short twat” who can’t get any girls, among others. And, of course, there’s Alice herself, played with bold sweetness by Carly Bawden, who becomes almost like a big sister to both Aly and Mrs Manxome. Enyi Okoronkwo is also convincing as Aly’s only school friend, Luke, battling zombies in a very entertaining number within his own smartphone game.

wonder.land
Musical
Royal National Theatre, London

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With all this going on, it’s hardly surprisingly the whole thing gets rather fragmented and chaotic as it continues. This isn’t helped by the fact that all the ‘real world’ scenery and characters stay on stage whilst the larger-the-life avatars invade to create wonder.land. I see why this is done -to make it clear that it’s only a virtual layer over the top of life, but it does just confuse things so much. Another recent production aiming to recreate the chaos of the internet Teh Internet is Serious Business managed this by not crossing the two worlds too much, and director Rufus Norris and set designer Rae Smith would be wise to consider the successful chaos of that production.

This was evening, then, that far exceeded my expectations. Thanks to the National Theatre’s excellent Entry Pass Scheme I ended up with a second row stalls seat for only a fiver so I got to experience the confetti shower (of course there’s a confetti shower) and felt like my eyes and ears were being constantly crowded with new, and even more crazy elements. blog 7The actors are excellent – I can’t really think of a weak link – with the three female leads particularly standing out in both voice and character. The music is bland in that you don’t really exit singing one of the songs, but they aren’t so bland as to be boring when actually watching. The set is far too chaotic, especially during the last frantic number, and the overall message is pretty standard musical fare yes. It’s not one for the ages. But I and my friend both had a really enjoyable night out watching wonder.land – and experiencing the fabulous exhibition enter wonder.land downstairs (it has a whole 3D virtual reality music video!) – and so I can’t agree with all those critics who’ve slagged this musical off so much. Moira Buffini and Norris may not have created the next West Side Story, but I highly doubt you’ll forget seeing this colourful, chaotic, crazy production.

wonder.land at the National Theatre: 3/5 stars

“Wife and child / Those precious motives, those strong knots of love.”

Macbeth, Act 4, Scene 3

William Shakespeare

Little Eyolf is an Ibsen play I’ve never actually heard of before, but the five stars I gave director Richard Eyre’s previous Ibsen production at the Almeida Theatre, Ghosts, meant I expected much from the same writer-director-theatre combo.

Indeed, many elements of the production are very similar. blog 5In the script there’s the classic themes of family, claustrophobia, marriage, women and, oh yeah, a love bordering on incest. Not sure I really want to know why Ibsen was quite so preoccupied with this theme… but I think it’s best to move on quite quickly. The set design, meanwhile, is also similar in its use of a single unchanging room and a dramatic sky in the background. As the show begins, we are greeted by a cool, spacious, pale wooden patio, a lower path behind, and dramatic, changing sky behind. A glowing sun rose from behind craggy mountains, and then was speedily covered by darkening clouds. Light, as in Ghosts, is used by Eyre, designer Tim Hatley, and lighting designer Peter Mumford to dramatise the domestic.

To summarise for those who, like me, had no idea what the plot of Little Eyolf is about; Alfred Allmers (Jolyon Coy) returns to his wife Rita (Lydia Leonard), sister Asta (Eve Posonby) and disabled young son Eyolf (Billy Marlow) from a trip away in the mountains, having experienced an epiphany; Eyolf is the most important thing in his life, and he will stop working, stop writing, in order to spend more time with the boy. But if you’re thinking “wow, this sounds ideal, what a great father” thenblog 1 think again. The tension between Rita and Asta, and Alfred and Rita, is palpable from the very beginning, and Alfred’s decision, followed by devastating tragedy, serves as a catalyst, letting all the bitter heated friction come pouring out in floods.

Now, I personally don’t think that this is one of Ibsen’s greatest plays, but it still has some striking themes. However, Coy as Alfred Allmers really let this production down. If you look back at my reviews, I’m not generally one to criticise actors – perhaps because of my sense of the director’s ultimate power, perhaps because the acting standard is so high nowadays, perhaps because I’m a softy.

But this stilted and proclamatory performance was flawed enough that all three of my companions commented on it immediately after the drama ended. blog 3The was Coy played Alfred as this buttoned-up man suddenly dealing with unexpected emotion made no sense when you thought even a little bit about the character’s backstory; Eyre must also be partly to blame here.

Luckily for Eyre, Coy, and us, the two female leads are excellent, and the strength of the production lies predominantly on their capable shoulders. Leonard plays Rita with unspeakable bitterness, and yet her unmotherly emotions, usually an instant cause for condemnation of a character, are expressed with such passion and conviction that, whilst we may not empathise, we can certainly sympathise with her suffering. Posonby, meanwhile, plays a far more sympathetic character and skilfully is able to make the ‘goodness’ of Aster still interesting; the little sister of Alfred, devoted to him, and Rita, and Eyolf, she could so easily be bland or take second place to the fascination of Rita, and yet it was Posonby my eyes were constantly drawn to, even when she had no lines.blog 4

The supporting actors have little to play with really, but the actors did well with what they were given; Sam Hazeldine is likeable as Bjarne but overshadowed by Eileen Walsh’s magnificent Rat Woman, complete with heavy Irish brogue, handbag chihuahua and blackened teeth. Billy Marlow as the eponymous Eyolf was one of the cutest children I have ever seen onstage, and played his surprisingly minor role with piping clarity.

blog 2This production, then, stars several superb performances from the female actors, and a slick stage design, but is let down by both by the script itself, which seems to me doesn’t explore all the issues it raises properly, and by its stiff leading man. Worth going to see for the issues and for Leonard and Posonby’s performances, but not near the standard of the Almeida’s recent productions (Ghosts, Oresteia, Medea).

Little Eyolf at the Almeida Theatre: 2.5/5 stars